Tag: Asian sauces

What is sriracha and is it hot?

What is sriracha

A foodie success story, sriracha has become the hot sauce on everyone’s lips. For those who think maybe they don’t like hot sauce, or have just been doing other things for the past decade, we ask ‘what is sriracha?’.

And more importantly, is it hot?

What is sriracha?

Sriracha is a chili sauce, originally from East Asia. Its exact origin is hotly debated but it is generally accredited to the town of Sri Racha in Thailand. What the world has come to know and love as sriracha actually comes from California, where it was invented by a Vietnamese immigrant. Hence the more familiar term of hot sauce.

Interestingly, sriracha is common in both Thailand and Vietnam but in Thailand it is used as a dipping sauce, where it has a thinner consistency and a sharper flavour with more vinegar. In Vietnam is is used more as a condiment.

Sriracha ingredients

It is made from chilies, sugar, salt, garlic and vinegar. Commercial varieties have xanthan gum added as a thickener to make it squeezable like mustard or ketchup. It is this squeezable aspect that is possibly, at least partly, responsible for it becoming a worldwide phenom.

Red jalapenos (which are basically green jalapenos that have ripened in the sun) are mixed with vinegar. This breaks them down and also helps to preserve the final product. Salt is added and the mixture is left to do its thing. Kind of like fermenting, but not strictly fermenting as it contains vinegar.

Once the chili, vinegar, salt combo has worked its magic, sugar and garlic are added. It is this, plus the flavour of the chilies, that gives sriracha its unique flavour profile.

Our sriracha chili sauce is certified organic so is made from 100% organic ingredients.

Is sriracha vegan?

The process of making sriracha does not involve any animal ingredients but the provenance of certain ingredients may be called into question. It depends how much of a hard line you take on veganism. Sugar and vinegar may both include animal by products in their processing.

Is sriracha gluten-free?

Theoretically, sriracha contains no ingredients with gluten. But, unless a product is labelled gluten-free and manufactured according to strict regulation it cannot be certified gluten-free. Vinegar, although made with grains, should be gluten-free but there are no guarantees.

So is sriracha sauce hot?

Sriracha brands will vary in their intensity, but as hot sauces go, sriracha is considered to be on the mild side.  It is more about flavour than heat, with a little kick that you miss once its gone. Chili excites the tastebuds, making them more receptive to flavour and waking up the appetite.

The Scoville scale measures the capsaicin content of chillies. Capsaicin irritates mucous membranes which is why chile peppers feel hot in your mouth or hurts like hell when you accidently rub it in your eye.

Jalapeno peppers, like they use in sriracha, register at around 5,000 to 9,000 units. The mild and licorice-y pasilla pepper used in Mexican cooking registers between 1,000 to 1,500. Currently the hottest chili pepper stands at 2 million plus. So, jalapeno is low to mid range hot.

The heat of chili can vary from fruit to fruit, even from the same plant. Factors such as processing time and other ingredients can also affect how hot chili feels in the mouth. Manufacturers will however go to great lengths to ensure their offering is consistent so once you find one you like, stick to it.

How many Scoville units is sriracha?

On average (although there really isn’t such a thing) sriracha comes in at about 2,200 Scoville units. Compared to the 3,750 of Tabasco.

Sriracha vs Tabasco

Tabasco is a Cajun style hot sauce made from vinegar, chile peppers, and salt. All about the interplay between chili and vinegar, it has a thin consistency and a sharp vinegar tang. Sriracha is more friendly, like ketchup with a kick, and is all about the extra dimensions from the sugar and garlic alongside the integral flavour of the peppers. Despite the heat, it is soft and rounded on the palate.

What does sriracha sauce taste like?

It is spicy, garlicky, tangy, salty and sweet. Pretty much flavour enhancer in a bottle. One that doesn’t contain MSG.

What goes with sriracha?

Absolutely everything. Seriously, everything. Not just for Asian food (although it is great with it) it ups the ante of everything you put in your mouth. Straight from the bottle it acts as a condiment, a seasoning, or both. Added to mayo, or cream cheese (or both) it becomes milder, creamy and moreish. You can use it as a marinade, and it makes meat taste awesome. It goes particularly well with eggs and cheese. It makes the best buffalo wings EVER.

Does sriracha go in the fridge?

No. It will keep well out of the fridge, but feel free to err on the side of caution and refrigerate anyway if you wish.

Take a look at our range of organic Asian sauces, or head over to our online wholesale  store for bulk buy groceries.

Are soba noodles gluten free and what are they made from?

are soba noodles gluten free

They are traditional Japanese noodles made from buckwheat. But are soba noodles gluten free and what are they actually made from?

With their robust flavour, soba noodles are perfect with aromatic Asian sauces but are they good for your health? Let’s find out.

What are soba noodles?

Soba is the Japanese word for buckwheat. Soba noodles have been around in Japan since the 17th century, when the aristocracy discovered they had health benefits over white rice and could cure beriberi. Thiamine was not identified until 1897, but we know now that the thiamine content of buckwheat was likely responsible for this. Soba making was a specialist art, confined to those who could afford it, and served in eating houses.

Nowadays everyone eats soba noodles and they are the traditional noodle of Tokyo. Available throughout the world as dried noodles, in Japan or Japanese restaurants they may be fresh and handmade.

Soba noodles are a long thin spaghetti like noodle with a beige brown colour and a slippery texture when cooked. It is considered correct to slurp your noodles as it enhances the flavour as well as cools them down. The flavour is nutty with a pleasing sourness like sourdough bread.

What are soba noodles made from?

what are soba noodles

Although soba noodles are made with buckwheat, they often contain wheat flour too. The usual percentage is 80% buckwheat to 20% wheat flour. Buckwheat noodles can be fragile and bitter so wheat flour is added to create a better texture. Some soba noodles may contain very little actual buckwheat so it is always best to read the label. They should contain nothing else other than flour and water.

Are soba noodles gluten free?

Because of the added wheat, not all soba noodles are gluten free. The most traditional variety of soba noodle, called juwari soba, are made from 100% buckwheat and are therefore gluten free. The texture is different to standard soba noodles. They are slightly grainy and very fragile, and are also more expensive.

If you tolerate gluten, go for a variety that contain the 80/20 ratio as the texture really is preferable.

Are soba noodles wholegrain?

Buckwheat is not strictly a wholegrain as it is a pseudo-grain not a cereal grain. Nutritionally speaking though, buckwheat is classed as a wholegrain and has all the benefits that go with it.

Are soba noodles healthier than pasta?

In comparison to wholegrain pasta, soba noodles are pretty similar. But who eats wholegrain pasta, right? Compared to dried pasta, made with refined white flour and no egg, soba noodles are certainly the healthy choice. With a lower GI, buckwheat can help to improve blood sugar control. It is also a good source of manganese and Vitamin B1 (thiamine). Full of fibre and also resistant starch, soba noodles can aid digestive health. Easily digestible, they provide a small amount of high quality protein that is rich in the amino acid lysine.

How to cook soba noodles

Cooking times for soba noodles will vary, as the thickness varies. So always follow the manufacturers instructions. Dropped in lightly salted boiling water they take about 3 to 5 minutes. Give them plenty of space and move them around often. Drain and serve hot, or run under cold water until cooled and serve cold.

Soba noodles are great with many of our Asian sauces, and are also particularly good served in broth.

For a great noodle dish, hot or cold, toss noodles in our Japanese dressing and scatter with finely chopped spring onions.

 

Choose from our range of organic Asian sauces, or head on over to our online bulk food store.

Using organic Asian sauces and spice pastes. Shortcuts to superb Asian dishes.

Title shortcuts with Asian sauces

Let’s face it, who always has the time or energy to cook full-on Asian recipes? Many of our favourite Asian sauces and spice pastes have a long list of ingredients that involve much grinding, crushing or both.

But nothing else will do. You want fragrant heat. Something sharp and spicy with creamy coconut. The thought of lemongrass and lime leaf just will not let go.

That’s when you need a shortcut to fast food.

Quick and easy recipes with organic Asian sauces

Shortcuts with Asian sauces

Quick and easy hot and sour soup

Serves 2

The organic Thai chili paste is hot, sweet and sharp with palm sugar, garlic, shallots and tamarind. So all the work has been done for you. Don’t be put off by the dried lime leaf, lemongrass or galangal. These organic powders retain their sharp fresh qualities and there is nothing there that a Thai cook would not use.

1 tbsp coconut oil

1 tbsp organic Thai chili paste

1/4 tsp organic lime leaf powder

1/4 tsp organic galangal powder

1/2 tsp organic lemongrass powder

2 cups chicken stock

3 tbsp fish sauce

10 king prawns, shelled and deveined

Juice of 2 limes

To garnish

Fresh coriander, chopped
  1. Heat the coconut oil in a saucepan. Add the Thai chili paste and the spice powders.
  2. Cook for 1 minute, and add the chicken stock with the fish sauce.
  3. Simmer for about 3 minutes to allow the flavours to combine.
  4. Drop in the prawns and cook for about 1 minute until they are opaque.
  5. Squeeze in the lime juice and serve into bowls.
  6. Garnish with fresh coriander.

 

Quick and easy Singapore black pepper chicken

Serves 2

A simple stir fry supper to serve with rice or noodles. The flavours are already in the sauce for you, but you can add a pinch of our organic ginger powder for an extra kick.

1 tbsp vegetable oil

2 chicken breasts, chopped

1 red pepper, sliced

4 spring onions, sliced

200g fine green beans, topped and tailed, and cut into 2 

1 tsp organic ginger powder

200g jar of organic black pepper sauce
  1. Heat the oil in a wok.
  2. Add the chicken, pepper, onions and green beans.
  3. Stir fry until the chicken is golden and the beans are tender crisp.
  4. Add the ginger and cook for 1 minute.
  5. Add the black pepper sauce, stir to combine, and cook for a few minutes or until the sauce has thickened slightly.
  6. Serve hot with rice or noodles.

 

Quick and easy Thai red fish curry

Serves 2

Thai red curry is more spicy and robust than Thai green curry and is perfect for the firm flesh of monkfish or the richness of salmon. Serve with steamed rice and some Asian greens.

1 tbsp coconut oil

3 tbsp organic Thai red curry paste

400g monkfish fillet, cubed

300g coconut milk

Juice of lime

To garnish

Fresh coriander, chopped
  1. Heat the coconut oil in a wok or saucepan.
  2. Add the curry paste and cook for 2 mins, stirring.
  3. Now add the fish and stir to coat with the curry paste.
  4. Pour in the coconut milk, bring to the boil, and then simmer for about 3 minutes or until the fish is just cooked.
  5. Add the lime juice and serve.
  6. Garnish with the fresh coriander.

Check out our range of Asian groceries and condiments or enjoy wholesale prices from our online Asian grocery store.

 


This Article was reproduced with permission from Opera Foods  article:- “Using organic Asian sauces and spice pastes. Shortcuts to superb Asian dishes.”